Insulin pumps for type 1 diabetes

People with unstable diabetes, or those needing many injections of insulin a day, may benefit from an insulin pump that is worn on the body (on a belt for instance) and that continuously delivers insulin via a needle implanted into the body. The pump can be programmed to deliver different amounts or types of insulin (very short-acting or short-acting) at different times during the day or night to help keep blood glucose levels within the recommended range.

You may need to test your blood glucose levels more often if you use an insulin pump to make sure that your blood glucose levels remain within the recommended levels. This is because the insulin in the pump is only active for a short time (short-acting). A health professional can provide advice about whether or not an insulin pump is right for you.

 

Register with the National Diabetes Services Scheme

The National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) can provide diabetes-related blood glucose monitoring equipment at subsidised prices, and provides information and support on a range of topics. Registration is free. Ring them on 1300 136 588 or visit www.ndss.com.au.

References
  • Craig ME, Twigg SM, Donaghue KC, et al for the Australian Type 1 Diabetes Guidelines Expert Advisory Group. National evidence-based clinical care guidelines for type 1 diabetes in children, adolescents and adults. Canberra: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 2011. www.diabetessociety.com.au/downloads/ Type1guidelines14Nov2011.pdf (accessed 15 November 2011).
  • Type 2 diabetes: priorities and targets. NPS NEWS (www.nps.org.au/health_professionals/publications/nps_news/current/type_2_diabetes_priorities_targets)
  • Yudkin JS, Richter B, Gale EA. Intensified glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes: time for a reappraisal. Diabetologia 2010;53:2079–85.
  • Turnbull FM, Abraira C, Anderson RJ, et al. Intensive glucose control and macrovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. Diabetologia 2009;52:2288–98.
  • Kearney PM, Blackwell L, Collins R, et al. Efficacy of cholesterol-lowering therapy in 18,686 people with diabetes in 14 randomised trials of statins: a meta-analysis. Lancet 2008;371:117–25.
  • Law MR, Morris JK, Wald NJ. Use of blood pressure lowering drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular disease: meta-analysis of 147 randomised trials in the context of expectations from prospective epidemiological studies. BMJ 2009;338:b1665.