What is an Asthma Action Plan?

An Asthma Action Plan is a set of instructions for how to manage your asthma symptoms and maintain good asthma control. Every person who has asthma should have a written Asthma Action Plan.

Why should I have an Asthma Action Plan?

Having an up-to-date, written Asthma Action Plan has been shown to reduce the chance of needing emergency medical treatment or hospitalisation for asthma. Despite this, many Australians who have asthma do not have an Asthma Action Plan.

Asthma action plan

Reproduced with permission from the National Asthma Council Australia.

Ask your doctor to prepare an Asthma Action Plan with you that includes:

Make sure that your written Asthma Action Plan is regularly reviewed and updated by your doctor.

You can download an Asthma Action Plan from Asthma Australia or the National Asthma Council Australia.

You should provide carers, teachers, friends and family with a copy of your child's Asthma Action Plan so that everyone involved in your child's care understands the symptoms and knows what to do in an asthma emergency.

It's important to have good asthma control

Find out more

References
  1. Asthma Australia (2013). Exercise-induced asthma. [online] (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  2. Asthma Australia (2013). Taking control of your asthma. [online] (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011). Asthma in Australia 2011: with a focus chapter on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Cat. no. ACM 22.). [online] Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  4. Department of Health and Ageing & National Asthma Council Australia (2004). Asthma and lung function tests: an information paper for health professionals. [full text] Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  5. Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) (2011). Guidelines and reports. [full text] (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  6. Lazarus S. C. (2010). Clinical practice: emergency treatment of asthma. New England Journal of Medicine 2010;363:755–64. [PubMed] (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  7. National Asthma Council Australia (2014). Spirometry resources. [online] Melbourne: National Asthma Council Australia. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  8. National Asthma Council Australia (2014). Peak flow chart. [online] (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  9. National Asthma Council Australia (2014). Asthma management handbook 2014. [online] Melbourne: National Asthma Council Australia. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  10. National Health Service (2010). Asthma in children. [online] London: National Health Service (NHS). (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  11. National Health Service (2010). Diagnosing asthma. [online] London: National Health Service (NHS). (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  12. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2011). Omalizumab for severe persistent allergic asthma. [online] London: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  13. Rossi, S. Ed. (2014). Australian Medicines Handbook. [online] Adelaide: Australian Medicines Handbook. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  14. Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne (2013). Fact sheet: asthma. [online] Melbourne: Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  15. Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne (2013). Fact sheet: asthma — use of spacers. [online] Melbourne: Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  16. Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne (2013). Fact sheet: bronchiolitis. [online] Melbourne: Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH). (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  17. Sweetman S, ed. Martindale: The complete drug reference. [online] Thomson Micromedex, London: Pharmaceutical Press. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  18. The Asthma Foundation of NSW (2006). Healthy pregnancy for women with asthma: an information paper for health professionals. [full text] Sydney: The Asthma Foundation of NSW. (Accessed 10 April 2014).
  19. Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd. (2014). Therapeutic guidelines complete 2014: asthma (eTG42). [online] (Accessed 10 April 2014).

The relevant consumer medicine information (CMI) and product information (PI) have been consulted for every medicine discussed.

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