Vitamin D tests

Vitamin D tests

A medical test is most useful to check for vitamin D deficiency in people who are at high risk of moderate to severe deficiency, but is not recommended for low-risk individuals.

About vitamin D tests

A vitamin D test is a simple blood test that measures a form of vitamin D in the blood, called 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD). In general, only people at high risk of vitamin D deficiency should have a vitamin D test. This mainly applies to people who don’t get enough sun, although other factors can also increase the risk of deficiency.

Find out more

For health professionals  

There is debate about the optimal level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD). Values anywhere between 50 and 110 nmol/L are advocated. It is likely that higher serum 25-OHD levels prevent some disease states, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend targets higher than 75 nmol/L.1 Vitamin D testing is not recommended for the majority of people in Australia. Current guidelines only recommend vitamin D testing in people who are at risk (for example, veiled women and people who are institutionalised, elderly, or dark-skinned), and the consequences of routine testing in low-risk populations are unclear. The accuracy of some assays at very low (clinically relevant) levels has also been questioned.

Clinical information

Summary of the latest evidence and guidelines on vitamin D tests to help you discuss the relevance of these tests with your patients.

Other tools and resources

Reference
  1. Nowson CA, McGrath JJ, Ebeling PR, et al. Vitamin D and health in adults in Australia and New Zealand: a position statement. Med J Aust 2012;196:686–7. [Pubmed]

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25 Jun 2013 Vitamin D levels are determined by a simple blood test that measures a form of vitamin D — called 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) — in the blood.
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25 Jun 2013 Vitamin D levels are determined by a simple blood test that measures a form of vitamin D in the blood. Read about what levels indicate a vitamin D deficiency.