Xyloproct Ointment

Xyloproct Ointment is a brand of medicine containing the active ingredients hydrocortisone acetate - lignocaine.

Find out more about active ingredients.

Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet

Developed by the pharmaceutical company responsible for this medicine in Australia, according to TGA regulations.


Lignocaine and hydrocortisone acetate

Consumer Medicine Information

What is in this leaflet

This leaflet answers some of the common questions people ask about Xyloproct. It does not contain all the information that is known about Xyloproct.

It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist.

All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor will have weighed the risks of you using Xyloproct against the benefits they expect it will have for you.

If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again.

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What XYLOPROCT is for

Xyloproct is used to relieve the pain and discomfort of haemorrhoids (piles), itching, cracking or tearing of the anus, and inflammation of the rectum and anus (back passage). Xyloproct is also used to relieve pain after surgery to the back passage.

Xyloproct contains a local anaesthetic and an anti-inflammatory medicine.

The local anaesthetic, lignocaine, works by making nerves unable to pass messages to the brain. Depending on the amount used, Xyloproct will either totally stop pain or will cause a partial loss of feeling.

The anti-inflammatory, hydrocortisone acetate (a corticosteroid), in Xyloproct reduces the redness and swelling that occurs when the body is injured.

Your doctor will have explained why you are being treated with Xyloproct and told you what dose to use.

Follow all directions given to you by your doctor carefully. They may differ from the information contained in this leaflet.

Your doctor may prescribe this medicine for another use. Ask your doctor if you want more information.

Xyloproct is not addictive.

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Before you use XYLOPROCT

When you must not use it

Do not use Xyloproct if you are pregnant or breastfeeding unless your doctor says so. Ask your doctor about the risks and benefits involved. Lignocaine and hydrocortisone have been used widely during pregnancy and there have been no reports of any ill effects on the baby.

Your baby can take in very small amounts of Xyloproct from breast milk if you are breastfeeding, but it is unlikely that the amount available to the baby will do any harm.

Do not use Xyloproct in children under 12.

Do not use after the use by (expiry) date printed on the pack. It may have no effect at all, or worse, an entirely unexpected effect if you take it after the expiry date.

Do not use Xyloproct if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering.

Do not use it to treat any other complaints unless your doctor tells you to.

Do not give this medicine to anyone else.

Before you start to use it

You must tell your doctor if:

  1. you have any allergies to:
    - any ingredients listed at the end of this leaflet
    - other local anaesthetics e.g. bupivacaine
    - any other substances
    If you have an allergic reaction, you may get a skin rash, hayfever, difficulty breathing or feel faint.
  2. you have any of these medical conditions
    - any infection, especially a viral, fungal or tubercular infection.

It may not be safe for you to use Xyloproct if you have any of these conditions.

Taking other medicines

Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines, including:

  • corticosteroids
  • medicines that you buy at the chemist, supermarket or health food shop.

These medicines may affect the way Xyloproct works.

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you what to do if you are taking any of these medicines.

If you have not told your doctor about any of these things, tell them before you use Xyloproct.

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How much to use

Your doctor will tell you how to apply the ointment to the back passage with the special applicator.

Do not use more than 6g of ointment (about a teaspoonful) in any 24 hour period.

Do not use for more than 7 days unless your doctor or pharmacist has told you to.

It will be easier to apply if you take it out of the refrigerator about an hour before you use it.

Xyloproct is intended for short-term use only.

If you forget to use it

If you miss a dose, apply it as soon as you remember.

If you have trouble remembering when to use your medicine, ask your pharmacist for some hints.


Telephone your doctor, the Poisons Information Centre (13 11 26) or go to casualty at your nearest hospital immediately if you think that you or anyone else may have used too much Xyloproct even if there are no signs of discomfort or poisoning.

If you use too much Xyloproct you will probably feel nervous and dizzy, and develop blurred vision and tremor.

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While you are using it

Things you must do

Stop using Xyloproct if the pain and discomfort continues.

Tell your doctor if it does not help.

Things to be careful of

Be careful driving or operating machinery until you know how Xyloproct affects you. It may have a very mild effect on alertness and co-ordination. You may become drowsy and your reflexes may be slow.

Please talk to your doctor or pharmacist about these possibilities if you think they may bother you.

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Side effects

Tell your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if you do not feel well while you are using Xyloproct. Xyloproct helps relieve pain and discomfort in most people with haemorrhoids (piles), anal itching, cracking or tearing, and rectal inflammation but it may have unwanted side-effects in a few people.

All medicines can have side effects. Sometimes they are serious, most of the time they are not. You may need medical treatment if you get some of the side effects.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist to answer any questions you may have.

If any of the following happen, stop using Xyloproct and tell your doctor immediately or go to casualty at your nearest hospital.

  • rash
  • increased or continued irritation
  • bleeding from the back passage
  • unusual bruising or marking of the skin
  • red, acne-like or itchy skin

These are all side effects of Xyloproct.

Tell your doctor if you notice anything else that is making you feel unwell. Some people may get other side effects while using Xyloproct.

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After using it


Replace the cap tightly on Xyloproct ointment after each use.

Keep Xyloproct in the refrigerator where the temperature stays between 2-8°C. Do not freeze.

Do not store it or any other medicine in the bathroom or near a sink. Heat and dampness can destroy some medicines.

Keep it where young children cannot reach it.

Do not leave it in the car on hot days.

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Ask your pharmacist what to do with any ointment you have left over if your doctor tells you to stop using them, or you find that the expiry date has passed.

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Product description

What Xyloproct looks like

Xyloproct is a white to slightly yellow ointment.


Xyloproct Ointment contains lignocaine base and hydrocortisone acetate as the active ingredients;


  • Aluminium acetate
  • Zinc Oxide
  • Cetyl alcohol
  • Stearyl alcohol
  • Macrogol 400
  • Macrogol 3350
  • Purified water

Xyloproct Ointment is available in 15g aluminium tube.

In the USA lignocaine is known as lidocaine.

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CMI provided by MIMS Australia, June 2015  

Related information - Xyloproct Ointment


23 Mar 2015 Information on medicines available in Australia containing hydrocortisone acetate - lignocaine, including our latest evidence-based information and resources for health professionals and consumers. The active ingredient is the chemical in a medicine that makes it work. Medicines that contain the same active ingredient can be available under more than one brand name. Brands include both active ingredients and inactive ingredients. You'll find information about brands of medicines that contain hydrocortisone acetate - lignocaine below, including their consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflets.
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