Zantac Concentrate for injection

Zantac Concentrate for injection is a brand of medicine containing the active ingredient ranitidine.

Find out more about active ingredients.

Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet

Developed by the pharmaceutical company responsible for this medicine in Australia, according to TGA regulations.

ZANTAC® Injection

Ranitidine (as hydrochloride)


Consumer Medicine Information

About your Zantac Injection

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you are given your medicine by a doctor or nurse.

This leaflet does not have the complete information available about your medicine. If you have any questions about your medicine, you should ask your doctor or pharmacist (also known as chemist).

All medicines have some risks. Sometimes new risks are found even when a medicine has been used for many years.

If there is anything you do not understand, ask your doctor or pharmacist . If you want more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

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What is the name of my medicine?

The name of your medicine is Zantac.

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What is in my Zantac Injection?

The medicine in your Zantac injection is called ranitidine (as hydrochloride). This belongs to a group of medicines called H2-antagonists.

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What does my Zantac Injection do?

Zantac injection is used to stop ulcers bleeding and other conditions caused by too much acid in the stomach.

Zantac works by reducing the amount of acid in the stomach. This reduces the pain and also allows the ulcer and reflux to heal.

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Before you have a Zantac injection?

Do not take if:

You must not take Zantac if:

  • you have ever had an allergic (hypersensitive) reaction to ranitidine or any of the ingredients listed towards the end of this leaflet.
  • the expiry date (EXP) printed on the pack has passed
  • the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering

Tell your doctor if

You must tell your doctor if:

  • you are allergic to foods, dyes, preservatives or any other medicines
  • you have ever had an allergic (hypersensitive) reaction to ranitidine or any of the ingredients listed towards the end of this leaflet.
  • you are allergic to any medicine,
  • you have stomach cancer
  • you have kidney disease
  • you have heart disease,
  • you have had stomach ulcers before and you are taking Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory (NSAID) medicines.
  • you have a disease known as acute porphyria.
  • you are over 65 years of age.
  • you have lung disease.
  • you are diabetic.
  • you have any problems with your immune system.
  • you have had to stop having this or any another medicine for your ulcer or reflux,

Taking Other Medicines

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, have taken any recently, or if you start new ones. This includes herbal medicines and any other medicines you have bought without a prescription.

Zantac can affect the way some other medicines work. Also other medicines can affect the way Zantac works.

In particular tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any of the following medicines:

  • warfarin, used to prevent blood clots
  • triazolam and midazolam, used as sedatives
  • ketoconazole, an anti-fungal
  • atazanavir and delaviridine, used to treat HIV
  • glipizide, used for diabetics
  • gefitinib, used in the treatment of cancer
  • Non-Steroidal Anti- Inflammatory (NSAID) medicines, for pain and inflammation
  • procainamide or n-acetylprocainamide, used to treat heart problems
  • sucralfate used to treat ulcers

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What if I am pregnant or breast feeding?

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, likely to get pregnant or are breast feeding. Your doctor will tell you if you should be given this medicine.

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How do I use my Zantac injection?

Your injection must only be given by a doctor or nurse. It will be injected deep into a vein. In some cases it may be given through a 'drip'.

Do not try to use the injection on your own.

The normal adult dosage of Zantac Injection is 50 milligrams of ranitidine (2 mL of the injection) every six to eight hours.

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Are there any side-effects with my Zantac, and what should I do if I get any side-effects?

Like other medicines, Zantac may cause some side-effects. Most of the side-effects will be minor and temporary, but some may be serious. Your doctor will be able to answer any questions you may have.

Tell your doctor straight away if after having the injection you have:

  • an allergic reaction, the signs may include:
    - skin reactions such as rash (red spots), itching, skin lumps or hives,
    - swelling of the eyelids, face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body
    - shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing, chest pain or tightness,
    - unexplained fever and feeling faint, especially when standing up.
  • severe stomach pain or a change in the type of pain,
  • yellow colouring of the skin or eyes (jaundice),
  • confusion,
  • general illness associated with weight loss,
  • fever,
  • irregular heart beat (including unusually fast or slow heart beats),
  • changes in heart beat,
  • chest infection.

If you get any of the following side effects after having the injection tell your doctor:

  • pain or flaking skin where you had the injection,
  • headache,
  • joint or muscle pains,
  • dizziness,
  • depression,
  • constipation.
  • feeling sick (nausea) or vomiting,
  • diarrhoea,
  • breast tenderness and/or breast enlargement,
  • breast discharge,
  • changes in liver function tests

If you notice any symptoms that concern you or if the injection causes any other side effects, tell your doctor or pharmacist.

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What do I do in case of an overdose?

As with any medicine, if too many injections have been used immediately telephone your doctor or the National Poisons Information Centre (telephone 131126) for advice. Do this even if there are no signs of discomfort or poisoning. Keep telephone numbers of these places handy.

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How do I store my Zantac Injection?

Your Zantac injection should be kept away from heat (below 25 degrees C) and in a place where children cannot reach it.

You will find an "expiry" (or use by) date printed on the manufacturer's label of the pack. The injection should not be used after this date.

The solution for injection should be clear, and colourless to pale yellow in colour. The injection should not be used if it is discoloured or cloudy.

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Can I let someone else use my Zantac Injection?

Never give this medicine to someone else. The medicine is only for you. It may harm other people even if they seem to have the same symptoms that you have.

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Product description

Zantac Injection is a clear, colourless to pale yellow liquid.

Each 2mL injection contains 50 mg of ranitidine (as hydrochloride).

Your injection also contains the following excipients: sodium chloride, sodium phosphate, water for injections.

Each pack contains five injections.

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Who makes my Zantac Injection?

Your Zantac Injection is made by:
Aspen Pharmacare Australia Pty Ltd
34-36 Chandos Street
St Leonards NSW 2065
Australia.

Zantac® is a registered trade mark of Aspen Global Incorporated.

Do not throw this leaflet away. You may need to read it again.

Date of Preparation: 2 October 2012

Zantac Injection - AUST R 12536

© 2010 Aspen Global Incorporated.

Version 2.0

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CMI provided by MIMS Australia, August 2015  

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