What vaccine and when?

Your child will need various vaccinations as they grow older.

Some vaccines are recommended for all children and teenagers, but there are some slight differences in different states or territories. This is because some infections may be present in some places and not others. Always check with your doctor or your local and/or state health authorities for what is recommended for you and your family (see Resources and useful links).

The tables below provide information about the recommended vaccines for:

For more in-depth information on each vaccine, click on the links in the tables.

Routine vaccinations for children

The vaccines listed in the table below are part of the National Immunisation Program schedule and are free for all eligible children.

If necessary, check with your doctor or local and/or state health authority to find out your child's eligibility.

Age Which Vaccine?
Birth

Hepatitis B

Tuberculosis (TB) or Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine
[Note: Queensland and Northern Territory only: newborns at high risk of tuberculosis infection]

6 weeks to 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months

Hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and polio (poliomyelitis) combined vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar 13)

Rotavirus

6 months to 5 years

Influenza (flu) — every year
[Note: this is only given to children with a medical condition that makes them more susceptible to complications after a flu infection]

12 months

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)

Meningococcal C

Hepatitis B
[Note: children who were premature babies only]

Pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar 13)
[Note: children who are medically at risk]

12 to 18 months

Pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar 13)
[Note: Given to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia]

Hepatitis A
[Note: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia]

18 months

Measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox (MMRV) vaccine
[Note: From 1 July 2013, the measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox) (MMRV) combination vaccine will replace the single chickenpox vaccine at 18 months AND the MMR vaccine at 4 years.]

Pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar 13)
[Note: All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and children who have not previously had Prevenar 13]

18 to 24 months

Hepatitis A
[Note: Given to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in Queensland, the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia]

3.5 to 4 years

Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and polio combined vaccine

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
[Note: from 1 July 2013 until 31 December 2015, the MMR vaccination will only be given to children who have not had the measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox) (MMRV) combination vaccine at 18 months.]

4 to 5 years
Pneumococcal vaccine (Pneumovax 23)
[Note: a booster dose for children medically at risk; not given in all states or territories — check with your doctor or your local and/or state health authorities]

Vaccines for adolescents and teenagers

The vaccines listed in the table below are part of the National Immunisation Program schedule and are free for all eligible adolescents and teenagers. Most of these vaccines are delivered via school-based immunisation programs.

Age
Which Vaccine?
11 to 13 years

Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) combined vaccine

12 to 13 years

Hepatitis B

Chickenpox (varicella zoster)
[Note: these vaccines are only given to children who have not had hepatitis B or chickenpox and who have not been previously vaccinated against them]

Human papillomavirus (HPV)
[Note: Gardasil is given free to all 12 and 13 year-old males and females through school-based programs in all states and territories; 14-15 year old males will also be able to have the vaccine at school under a catch-up program till December 2014.]

14 to 15 years

Human papillomavirus (HPV)
[Note: Gardasil is given free to all 14-15 year old males at school in all states and territories under a catch-up program till December 2014.]

15 years and older

Influenza (flu)
[Note: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teenagers who are medically at risk]

Pneumococcal vaccine (Pneumovax 23)
[Note: only Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teenagers who are medically at risk]

References