Neurology resources

Up-to-date information and resources for health professionals to optimise the safety and health outcomes of immunoglobulin for patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and myasthenia gravis (MG).

Neurology resources

Key points

  • CIDP is one of the most treatable forms of polyneuropathy.
  • Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids and plasmapheresis are effective first-line treatments for CIDP.
  • Objective measures of impairment and disability should be used to evaluate treatment response.
  • Patients without an objective response should not continue IVIg.
  • In IVIg responders, the minimal clinically effective dose should be identified by sequential, small (~20%) dose alterations.
  • For patients who are clinically stable, a trial of immunoglobulin weaning towards cessation should be considered at least annually to identify patients in remission.
 

Information and resources for health professionals



Clinical Guidance Article
Written by a team of leading neurologists, this article provides the foundations and evidence for prescribing immunoglobulin to patients with CIDP in Australia.

Case studies
Three hypothetical case studies in which patients present with CIDP or conditions easily mistaken for CIDP. How would you progress their care?

 

Resources to use with your patients

Immunoglobulin products for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

This fact sheet explains how immunoglobulin products can be used to treat CIDP, to help your patients make informed decisions about the care that is right for them.

Immunoglobulin products for CIDP

Date published : 15 September 2022

Immunoglobulin management and wellbeing plan
This fillable plan allows patients to keep track of their appointments, treatment and condition.

Immunoglobulin products: when to reduce or stop treatment
This action plan informs and empowers patients to participate in changes to their treatment.

Immunoglobulin dose adjustment, weaning and cessation: a conversation guide for health professionals
It is common for patients to feel reluctant to make changes to their treatment. This conversation guide supports clinician-led discussions around changes to immunoglobulin treatment plans.

Key points

  • In myasthenic crisis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) infusion has non-inferior effectiveness and superior safety compared with plasma exchange in small studies. Acute treatment with IVIg is indicated in severe, generalised MG affecting respiratory and/or bulbar muscles.
  • IVIg infusion prior to surgery and/or thymectomy is indicated for patients with advanced MG, bulbar symptoms and/or respiratory involvement.
  • As an adjunct treatment in chronic MG, IVIg should be a stop-gap treatment whilst the patient stabilises on other standard therapies. IVIg does not result in disease remission.
 

Information and resources for health professionals

Clinical Guidance Article
Written by a team of leading neurologists, this article provides the foundations and evidence for prescribing immunoglobulin to patients with MG in Australia.

    Case studies
    Five hypothetical case studies in which patients present with MG. How would you progress their care?

       

      Resources to use with your patients



      Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in myasthenia gravis

      This fact sheet explains how immunoglobulin products can be used to treat myasthenia gravis, to help your patients make informed decisions about the care that is right for them.

      Immunoglobulin management and wellbeing plan
      This fillable plan allows patients to keep track of their appointments, treatment and condition.

      Immunoglobulin products: when to reduce or stop treatment
      This action plan informs and empowers patients to participate in changes to their treatment.

      Immunoglobulin dose adjustment, weaning and cessation: a conversation guide for health professionals
      It is common for patients to feel reluctant to make changes to their treatment. This conversation guide supports clinician-led discussions around changes to immunoglobulin treatment plans.