Consumer medicine information

Optiray

Ioversol

BRAND INFORMATION

Brand name

Optiray

Active ingredient

Ioversol

Schedule

Unscheduled

 

Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet

Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Optiray.

What is in this leaflet

This leaflet answers some common questions about OPTIRAY. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor.

All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of using OPTIRAY against the benefits it is expected to have for you.

If you have any concerns about receiving OPTIRAY, ask your doctor.

Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.

In this leaflet:

  1. What is OPTIRAY and what it is used for
  2. Before you are given OPTIRAY
  3. How OPTIRAY is given
  4. When you are given OPTIRAY
  5. Possible side effects
  6. Product Description

1. What is OPTIRAY and what it is used for

OPTIRAY is an injectable contrast medium. It is used to make clearer diagnostic images of the brain and body in adults and children. As a result, it helps to clearly show abnormalities in the brain or body. This medicine is for diagnostic use only.

2. Before you are given OPTIRAY

When you must not use it

Do not use OPTIRAY if you are allergic (hypersensitive):

  • to the active substance ioversol, or
  • to any of the other ingredients in OPTIRAY

Take special care with OPTIRAY

Diagnostic procedures involving the use of contrast agents should be conducted under supervision of a physician with the prerequisite training and a thorough knowledge of the procedure to be performed.

Before you start to use it

Tell your doctor if:

  • you suffer from allergies (e.g. medicinal products, seafood, hay fever, hives) or asthma
  • you had any reaction to previous injections of a contrast agent, including a previous history of reaction to iodine-based agents
  • your kidneys do not function properly
  • OPTIRAY is planned to be used in your child who is under the age of two years

Tell your doctor if:

  • you are pregnant, intend to become pregnant or breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. If you receive this medicine whilst pregnant, your newborn should be tested to ensure they are producing the correct amount of thyroid hormone.
  • you are feeling thirst and/or you have only had small quantities or nothing to drink before the examination
  • you have a cardiac pacemaker or any ferromagnetic implant (vascular clips, etc.) or a metallic stent in your body
  • you are taking a special kind of antihypertensive medicine, i.e. a beta-blocker
  • you have heart disease
  • you suffer from epilepsy or brain lesions
  • you are or your child is on a controlled sodium diet
  • If any of these apply to you, your doctor will decide whether the intended examination is possible or not.

Using other medicines

Please tell your doctor if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines including medicines obtained without a prescription from your pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop.

Pregnancy and breast feeding
It is not known whether OPTIRAY is excreted in human milk. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant and ask your doctor for advice before you are given OPTIRAY.

Driving and using machines
If you are an ambulant patient and plan to drive or use tools or machines, take into account that dizziness may incidentally occur after you undergo a procedure involving the injection of OPTIRAY.

Important information about some of the ingredients of OPTIRAY
This medicine contains the following ingredients in each mL of OPTIRAY. Please refer to the table below.

3. How OPTIRAY is given

The usual dose

Your doctor will decide how much you will be given. This depends on your condition and other factors. Patients should be well hydrated prior to and following the administration of OPTIRAY.

4. When you are given OPTIRAY

Things to be careful of

This medicine may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, tiredness or drowsiness in some people. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive, operate machinery or do anything else that could be dangerous. Children should be careful when riding bicycles or climbing trees.

If you feel lightheaded, dizzy or faint when getting out of bed or standing up, get up slowly. Standing up slowly, especially when you get up from bed or chairs, will help your body get used to the change in position and blood pressure. If this problem continues or gets worse, talk to your doctor.

If you are given more OPTIRAY than you should have been (overdose)

Overdosage may occur. The adverse effects of overdosage are potentially life-threatening and affect mainly the pulmonary, cardiovascular system and central nervous systems. Treatment of an overdose is directed toward the support of all vital functions and prompt institution of symptomatic therapy. OPTIRAY does not bind to plasma or serum proteins and is therefore dialysable.

If you have any further questions or concerns on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

The following adverse effects have occurred in conjunction with the administration of iodinated intravascular contrast agents for this purpose: low blood pressure, shock, chest pains, cardiac arrest, slow heart rate, abnormally rapid heart rhythm, death. Severe adverse reactions, especially abnormal heart rhythms, are likely to occur with greater frequency following right coronary artery injection. Fatalities have been reported.

Some paediatric patients have a higher risk of adverse reactions to contrast media. Such patients may include those with sensitivity to allergens, including other drugs,those with asthma, congestive heart failure, a serum creatinine 1.5 mg/dL, or ages under 12 months.

Immediately tell the doctor or nurse/technologist who is giving you the injection, if you feel unwell, especially if you feel any tightness, pain or discomfort in your chest, face or throat, or you have difficulty breathing.

5. Possible side effects

6. Product Description

Ingredients:

  • The active substance is ioversol.
  • 1 mL contains 509 to 741 mg of ioversol, depending on the concentration of OPTIRAY being administered.
  • The other ingredients are: sodium calcium edetate, Trometamol, trometamol hydrochloride, sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid, and water for injections.

This medicine does not contain lactose, sucrose, gluten, tartrazine or any other azo dyes.

What OPTIRAY looks like and contents of the pack

OPTIRAY contains a clear, colourless to pale yellow solution.

OPTIRAY is supplied in vials fitted with bromobutyl rubber closures and aluminium cap seals.

OPTIRAY is supplied in prefilled syringes made of polypropylene. Syringe tip cap and piston are made of bromobutyl rubber.

OPTIRAY is supplied in boxes of 10 or 20 units.

The following concentrations are available:

OPTIRAY 240

  • 30 mL injection vial AUST R 15326
  • 50 mL injection vial AUST R 49410
  • 50 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 46639
  • 125 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 46640

OPTIRAY 320

  • 20 mL injection vial AUST R 20034
  • 30 mL injection vial AUST R 49421
  • 50 mL injection vial AUST R 49422
  • 100 mL injection vial AUST R 49423
  • 150 mL injection vial AUST R 49424
  • 200 mL injection vial AUST R 49425
  • 50 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 46641
  • 75 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 73580
  • 125 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 46642

OPTIRAY 350

  • 20 mL injection vial AUST R 49610
  • 30 mL injection vial AUST R 47856
  • 50 mL injection vial AUST R 47996
  • 75 mL injection vial AUST R 47997
  • 100 mL injection vial AUST R 47998
  • 150 mL injection vial AUST R 49611
  • 200 mL injection vial AUST R 49612
  • 30 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 51795
  • 50 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 51796
  • 75 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 70059
  • 100 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 61983
  • 125 mL injection Ultraject® syringe AUST R 61984

Not all presentations may be available for supply.

Do not use the solution if it is discoloured or particulate material is present.

Sponsor

For any information about this medicine, please contact the sponsor:

Guerbet Australia Pty Ltd
Sydney NSW, Australia
Telephone: 1800 859 436
Email: [email protected]

This leaflet was revised in February 2020.

Published by MIMS April 2020

BRAND INFORMATION

Brand name

Optiray

Active ingredient

Ioversol

Schedule

Unscheduled

 

1 Name of Medicine

Ioversol.

6.7 Physicochemical Properties

Chemical structure.

Ioversol is designated chemically as N, N'-bis (2, 3-dihydroxypropyl)-5-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycollamido]-2, 4, 6-triiodoisopthalamide.
It has the following structural formula:
The molecular weight of ioversol is 807.13 and the organically bound iodine content is 47.2%. Ioversol is non-ionic and does not dissociate in solution.

CAS number.

87771-40-2.

2 Qualitative and Quantitative Composition

Optiray (ioversol injection) formulations are sterile, non-pyrogenic, aqueous solutions intended for intravascular administration as diagnostic radiopaque media.
Each millilitre of Optiray 240 (ioversol injection 51%) provides 509 mg of ioversol with 3.6 mg of trometamol as a buffer and 0.2 mg of sodium calcium edetate as a stabiliser. Optiray 240 provides 24% (240 mg/mL) organically bound iodine.
Each millilitre of Optiray 320 (ioversol injection 68%) provides 678 mg of ioversol with 3.6 mg of trometamol as a buffer and 0.2 mg of sodium calcium edetate as a stabiliser. Optiray 320 provides 32% (320 mg/mL) organically bound iodine.
Each millilitre of Optiray 350 (ioversol injection 74%) provides 741 mg of ioversol with 3.6 mg of trometamol as a buffer and 0.2 mg of sodium calcium edetate as a stabiliser. Optiray 350 provides 35% (350 mg/mL) organically bound iodine.
The pH of the Optiray formulations has been adjusted to 6.0 to 7.4 with hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide.
Some physical and chemical properties of these formulations are listed in Table 1.
For the full list of excipients, see Section 6.1 List of Excipients.

3 Pharmaceutical Form

Solution for injection.
The Optiray formulations are clear, colourless to pale yellow solutions containing no undissolved solids. Crystallisation does not occur at temperatures above 15°C. The products are supplied in containers from which the air has been displaced by nitrogen. Optiray solutions have osmolalities 1.2 to 2.5 times that of plasma (285 mOsm/kg water) as shown in Table 1 and are hypertonic under conditions of use.

5 Pharmacological Properties

5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

No data available.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

The pharmacokinetics of ioversol in normal adult subjects conform to an open two compartment model with first order elimination (a rapid α-phase for drug distribution and a slower β-phase for drug elimination). Based on the blood clearance curves for twelve healthy adult volunteers (six receiving 50 mL and six receiving 150 mL of Optiray 320), the biological half-life was 1.5 hours for both dose levels and there was no evidence of any dose related difference in the rate of elimination.
Ioversol is excreted mainly through the kidneys following intravascular administration. In patients with impaired renal function, the elimination half-life is prolonged. In the absence of renal dysfunction, the mean half-life for urinary excretion following a 50 mL dose was 118 minutes (105 to 156) and following a 150 mL dose was 105 minutes (74 to 141). Faecal elimination was negligible.
Ioversol is bound to serum or plasma proteins to the extent of 9 to 13% only and no significant metabolism or biotransformation occurs.
Intravascular injection of ioversol opacifies those vessels in the path of the flow of the contrast medium, permitting radiographic visualisation of the internal structures until significant haemodilution occurs.
Ioversol may be visualised in the renal parenchyma within 30 to 60 seconds following rapid intravenous injection. Opacification of the calyces and pelves in patients with normal renal functions becomes apparent within 1 to 3 minutes, with optimum contrast occurring within 5 to 15 minutes.
Pharmacokinetics of ioversol in children has not been established.

5.3 Preclinical Safety Data

Animal studies indicate that ioversol does not cross the blood-brain barrier or cause endothelial damage to any significant extent.

4 Clinical Particulars

4.1 Therapeutic Indications

Optiray is indicated in adults for angiography throughout the cardiovascular system by conventional or digital subtraction techniques. These include cerebral, coronary, peripheral, visceral and renal arteriography, aortography, left ventriculography and venography. Optiray may be used for intravenous excretory urography.
Optiray 320 is indicated in children (excluding neonates) for angiocardiography, contrast enhanced computed tomographic imaging of the head and body, and intravenous excretory urography.

4.3 Contraindications

Known hypersensitivity to ioversol (Optiray); thyrotoxicosis; anuria; decompensated cardiac insufficiency.
Certain specific procedures and situations, e.g. carotid artery angiography during the progressive period of stroke, coronary arteriography in the first four weeks after myocardial infarction, and the presence of infection or open injury in or near the region to be examined.

4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use

(Precautions for specific procedures receive comment, see Section 4.2 Dose and Method of Administration.)
Serious or fatal reactions have been associated with the administration of iodine containing radiopaque media. It is of utmost importance to be completely prepared to treat any contrast medium reactions.
The possibility that a serious reaction may occur should always be considered (see Section 4.8 Adverse Effects (Undesirable Effects)). Increased risk is associated with a history of previous reaction to a contrast medium, a known sensitivity to iodine and known allergies or hypersensitivities including asthma. However, while this implies the need for extra caution it does not necessarily contraindicate the use of the contrast medium.
Premedication with antihistamines or corticosteroids to avoid or minimise possible allergic reactions in such patients should be considered. Reports indicate that such pretreatment does not prevent serious life threatening reactions, but may reduce both their incidence and severity.
The occurrence of severe idiosyncratic reactions has prompted the use of several pretesting methods. However, pretesting cannot be relied upon to predict severe reactions and may itself be hazardous to the patient. It is suggested that a thorough medical history with emphasis on allergy and hypersensitivity, prior to the injection of any contrast medium, may be more accurate than pretesting in predicting potential adverse reactions.
Administration of the contrast agent and the investigation must be interrupted if pronounced side effects or allergic reactions occur during the administration, and appropriate treatment should be instituted. If, despite this, the reactions do not disappear, or even grow worse, the investigation must be terminated. Even relatively minor symptoms, such as itching of the skin, sneezing, violent yawning, tickling in the throat, hoarseness, coughing fits, may be initial signs of a severe reaction (including shock), so careful attention should be paid to them.
In patients with severe impairment of hepatic or renal function, cardiac and circulatory insufficiency, pulmonary emphysema, poor general health, cerebral arteriosclerosis, juvenile-type diabetes or diabetes of long standing, cerebral spasmodic conditions and latent thyroid hyperfunction, the need for examination merits particularly careful consideration. Diabetics with serum creatinine above 500 micromol/L should not be examined unless the possibility of benefit clearly outweighs the additional risk.
In patients with renal impairment the maximum dose should not be exceeded (see Section 4.2 Dose and Method of Administration). Intravascular administered iodine containing radiopaque media are potentially hazardous in patients with multiple myeloma or other paraproteinemia diseases. Myeloma occurs most commonly in persons over age 40. Although neither the contrast agent nor dehydration has been proved separately to be the cause of anuria in myelomatous patients, it has been speculated that the combination of both may be causative. The risk in myelomatous patients is not a contraindication to the procedure, however, special precautions, including maintenance of normal hydration and close monitoring are required.
Administration of radiopaque materials to patients known or suspected of having pheochromocytoma should be performed with extreme caution. If, in the opinion of the physician, the possible benefits of such procedures outweigh the considered risks, the procedures may be performed, however the amount of radiopaque medium injected should be kept to an absolute minimum. The blood pressure should be assessed throughout the procedure, and measures for treatment of a hypertensive crisis should be available.
Contrast media may promote sickling in individuals who are homozygous for sickle cell disease when administered intravascularly.
As with any contrast medium, serious neurologic sequelae, including permanent paralysis, can occur following cerebral arteriography, selective spinal arteriography and arteriography of vessels supplying the spinal cord. A cause-effect relationship to the contrast medium has not been established since the patients' pre-existing condition and procedural technique are causative factors in themselves. The arterial injection of a contrast medium should never be made following the administration of vasopressor since they strongly potentiate neurologic effects.
Caution must be exercised in patients with severely impaired renal function, combined renal and hepatic disease, or anuria, particularly when large doses are administered.
Do not mix other drugs with Optiray.
General anaesthesia may be indicated in the performance of some procedures in selected patients, however, a higher incidence of adverse reactions has been reported in these patients, and may be attributed to the inability of the patient to identify untoward symptoms or to the hypotensive effect of anaesthesia which can prolong the circulation time and increase the duration of exposure to the contrast agent.
Reports of thyroid storm following the intravascular use of iodinated radiopaque agents in patients with an autonomously functioning thyroid nodule suggest that this additional risk be evaluated in such patients before use of any contrast medium.

General.

Diagnostic procedure which involve the use of iodinated intravascular contrast agents should be carried out under the direction of personnel skilled and experienced in the particular procedure to be performed. A fully equipped emergency cart, or equivalent supplies and equipment, and personnel competent in recognising and treating adverse reactions of all types should always be available. Since severe delayed reactions have been known to occur, emergency facilities and competent personnel should be available for at least 30 to 60 minutes after administration.
Preparatory dehydration is dangerous and may contribute to acute renal failure. Fluid intake should not be restricted before the use of Optiray, especially in patients with multiple myeloma, juvenile-type diabetes or diabetes of long standing, polyuria, oliguria, gout in babies or small children, elderly or in debilitated patients and patients should be well hydrated following the administration of Optiray.
In angiographic procedures, the possibility of dislodging plaques or damaging or perforating the vessel wall should be considered during catheter manipulations and contrast medium injection. Test injections to ensure proper catheter placement are suggested.
The inhibitory effects of nonionic contrast media on mechanisms of haemostasis have been shown, in vitro, to be less than conventional ionic contrast media at comparable concentrations. For this reason, standard angiographic procedures should always be followed, e.g. angiographic catheters should be flushed frequently and prolonged contact of blood with the contrast agent in syringes and catheters should be avoided.
Angiography should be avoided whenever possible in patients with homocystinuria because of the risk of inducing thrombosis and embolism.
Patients with congestive heart failure should be observed for several hours following the procedure to detect delayed haemodynamic disturbances which may be associated with a transitory increase in the circulating osmotic load.
Any contrast medium solution left over from the examination must be discarded. The potential risk of seizures may be increased under the following conditions: large dose of contrast medium, renal failure, blood-brain barrier disruption.

Other.

Other precautions which apply to the various radiographic contrast procedures are the same for Optiray as they are for conventional ionic media.
The risk of the procedure itself should be carefully evaluated in each patient. Such precautions include:

Cerebral angiography.

Used with caution in patients with extreme senility, advanced atherosclerosis or severe hypotension.
The procedure may be hazardous in subarachnoid haemorrhage and in migraine (because of ischaemic complications).

Peripheral angiography.

Pulsation should be present in the artery to be injected.
In thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) or ischaemia associated with ascending infection, angiography should be performed with extreme caution, if at all.

Cardioangiography.

Caution is advised in the administration of large volumes to patients with incipient heart failure because of the possibility of aggravating the pre-existing condition. Hypotension should be corrected promptly since it may induce serious arrhythmias.
Caution is advised with dosage in patients with right ventricular failure, pulmonary hypertension or stenotic pulmonary vascular beds because of the haemodynamic changes which may occur after injection into the right heart outflow tract.

Urography.

It is advisable to allow an interval of at least 48 hours before repeating excretory urography.
Dehydration should be avoided in the elderly, particularly those with polyuria, oliguria, advanced vascular disease or pre-existing dehydration (see Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use).
Myelomatosis (see Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use).

Use in the elderly.

The tolerance of elderly patients to drugs in general is diminished. These patients may have reduced renal reserve, impaired general health and may be taking medication (e.g. adrenergic β-blockers) which make them more susceptible to the potentially harmful effects of procedures involving the use of contrast media. The need for and the expected benefits of the procedure have to be carefully evaluated and dosage should be very conservative.

Paediatric use.

Some paediatric patients have a higher risk of adverse reactions to contrast media. Such patients may include those with sensitivity to allergens, including other drugs, those with asthma, congestive heart failure, a serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, or ages under 12 months.

Infants.

Thyroid function in infants exposed to iodinated contrast media (ICM) should be evaluated and monitored. Decreased levels of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) and increased level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were reported after exposure to ICM in infants, especially preterm infants, which remained for up to a few weeks or more than a month. Thyroid function in infants exposed to ICM should therefore be evaluated and monitored until thyroid function is normalised. Some patients were treated for hypothyroidism.

Effects on laboratory tests.

The results of PBI and radioactive iodine uptake studies, which depend on iodine estimation, will not accurately reflect thyroid function for up to sixteen days following administration of iodinated contrast media. However, thyroid function tests not depending on iodine estimations e.g. T3 resin uptake and total or free thyroxine (T4) assays are not likely to be affected.

Information for patients.

Patients receiving iodinated intravascular contrast agents should be instructed to:
1. Inform your physician if you are pregnant.
2. Inform your physician if you are diabetic or if you have multiple myeloma, pheochromocytoma, homozygous sickle cell disease or known thyroid disorder (see Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use).
3. Inform your physician if you are allergic to any drugs or food, or if you had any reactions to previous injections of dyes used for X-ray procedures (see Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use).

4.5 Interactions with Other Medicines and Other Forms of Interactions

Renal toxicity has been reported in a few patients with liver dysfunction who were given oral cholecystographic agents followed by intravascular contrast agents. Administration of any intravascular contrast agent should therefore be postponed in patients who have recently received a cholecystographic contrast agent.
Other drugs should not be mixed with Optiray injection.

4.6 Fertility, Pregnancy and Lactation

Effects on fertility.

No long term animal studies have been performed to evaluate carcinogenic potential. However, animal studies suggest that this drug is not mutagenic and does not affect fertility in males or females.
(Category B1)
No teratogenic effects attributable to ioversol have been observed in teratology studies performed on animals using doses up to 3.2 gL/kg. There are, however, no adequate and well controlled studies in pregnant women. It is not known whether Optiray crosses the placental barrier or reaches foetal tissues. However, many injectable contrast agents cross the placental barrier in humans and appears to enter foetal tissue passively. Because animal teratology studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. X-ray procedures involve a certain risk related to the exposure of the foetus.
Infants born to women who received iodinated contrast media while pregnant should have testing for hypothyroidism in the neonatal period. Some patients were treated for hypothyroidism. Also see Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use, Paediatric use.

Nursing mothers.

It is not known whether ioversol is excreted in human milk. However, many injectable contrast agents are excreted unchanged in human milk. Although it has not been established that serious adverse reactions occur in nursing infants, caution should be exercised when intravascular contrast media are administered to nursing women because of potential adverse reactions, and considerations should be given to temporarily discontinuing nursing.
Also see Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use, Paediatric use.

4.8 Adverse Effects (Undesirable Effects)

Adverse reactions following the use of Optiray formulations are usually mild to moderate, of short duration and generally resolve spontaneously (without treatment).
Injections of contrast media are often associated with sensations of warmth and pain, especially in peripheral arteriography. When compared with ionic contrast media, warmth and pain occurred less frequently and were less severe with ioversol injection.
Table 2 incidence of reactions is based upon clinical trials with Optiray formulations in over 1000 adult patients. This listing includes all adverse reactions which were coincidental to the administration of ioversol regardless of their direct attributability to the drug or the procedure. Adverse reactions are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of occurrence. Significantly more severe reactions are listed before others in a system regardless of frequency.
Regardless of the contrast medium employed, the overall incidence of serious adverse reaction is higher with coronary arteriography than with other procedures. Cardiac decompensation, serious arrhythmias, myocardial ischaemia or myocardial infarction may occur during coronary arteriography and left ventriculography. In coronary arteriography clinical studies with ioversol, the only adverse reaction with an incidence of greater than one percent was angina (1.6%).
Following coronary artery and left ventricular injection, electrocardiograms and cardiovascular and haemodynamic functions were affected less frequently with Optiray (ioversol injection) than with the comparative ionic contrast agents. These changes included the following parameters: bradycardia, tachycardia, T wave amplitude, ST depression and ST elevation.
Optiray has also been shown to cause fewer changes in cardiac function and systemic blood pressure. These include cardiac output, left ventricular systolic and end diastolic pressure, right ventricular systolic and pulmonary artery systolic pressures and decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Paediatrics.

In clinical trials involving 128 patients for paediatric angiocardiography, contrast enhanced computed tomographic imaging of the head and body, or intravenous excretory urography, adverse reactions following the use of Optiray 320 were generally similar to adults.

General adverse reactions to contrast media.

The following adverse reactions are possible with any parenterally administered iodinated contrast medium.
Severe life-threatening reactions and fatalities, most of cardiovascular origin, have occurred. Most deaths occur during injection or 5 to 10 minutes later; the main feature being cardiac arrest with cardiovascular disease as the main aggravating factor. Isolated reports of hypotensive collapse and shock are found in the literature. Based upon clinical literature, reported deaths from the administration of conventional iodinated contrast agents range from 6.6 per 1 million (0.00066%) to 1 in 10,000 (0.01%).
Adverse reactions to injectable contrast media fall into two categories; chemotoxic reactions and idiosyncratic reactions.
Chemotoxic reactions result from the physicochemical properties of the contrast medium, the dose and the speed of injection. All haemodynamic disturbances and injuries to organs or vessels perfused by the contrast medium are included in this category.
Idiosyncratic reactions include all other reactions. They occur more frequently in patients 20 to 40 years old. Idiosyncratic reactions may or may not be dependent on the dose injected, the speed of injection, the mode of injection and the radiographic procedure.
Idiosyncratic reactions are subdivided into minor, intermediate and severe. The minor reactions are self-limited and of short duration; the severe reactions are life-threatening and treatment is urgent and mandatory.
In addition to the adverse reactions reported for ioversol, the following additional adverse reactions have been reported with the use of other contrast agents and are possible with any water soluble, iodinated contrast agent.

Endocrine.

Thyroid function tests indicative of hypothyroidism or transient thyroid suppression have been uncommonly reported following iodinated contrast media administration to adult and paediatric patients, including infants. Some patients were treated for hypothyroidism.

Nervous.

Muscular spasm, convulsions, aphasia, syncope, paralysis, visual field losses which are usually transient but may be permanent, coma and death.

Cardiovascular.

Angioneurotic oedema, peripheral oedema, vasodilation, thrombosis and rarely thrombophlebitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and shock.

Skin.

Maculopapular rash, erythema, conjunctival symptoms, ecchymosis and tissue necrosis.

Respiratory.

Choking, dyspnoea, wheezing which may be an initial manifestation of more severe and infrequent reactions including asthmatic attack, laryngospasm and bronchospasm, pulmonary oedema, apnoea and cyanosis. Rarely these allergic type reactions can progress into anaphylaxis with loss of consciousness, coma, severe cardiovascular disturbances and death.

Miscellaneous.

Hyperthermia, temporary anuria or other nephropathy.
(Adverse reactions for specific procedures receive comment, see Section 4.8 Adverse Effects (Undesirable Effects)).

Serious or life threatening reactions.

See Section 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use.
Reporting suspected adverse reactions after registration of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit-risk balance of the medicinal product. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems.

4.2 Dose and Method of Administration

It is desirable that intravascular administered iodinated contrast agents be at, or close to, body temperature when injected.
As with all radiopaque contrast agents, only the lowest dose necessary to obtain adequate visualisation should be used.
Under no circumstances should any other drug be mixed with the contrast media because of the potential for chemical incompatibility.
Withdrawal of contrast agents from their containers should be accomplished under strict aseptic conditions using only sterile syringes and transfer devices. Contrast agents which have been transferred into other delivery systems should be used immediately.
Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discolouration prior to administration and should not be used if particulates are observed or marked discolouration has occurred.
The Optiray formulations are supplied in single dose containers. Discard unused portion.

General angiography.

Visualisation of the cardiovascular system may be accomplished by any accepted technique. Since intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) requires adjustments in the method of administration, this procedure is described separately.

Cerebral arteriography.

Additional precautions and adverse reactions.

Extreme caution is advised in patients with advanced arteriosclerosis, severe hypertension, cardiac decompensation, senility, recent cerebral thrombosis or embolism and migraine. Cardiovascular reaction that may occur with some frequency are bradycardia and either an increase or decrease in systemic blood pressure.

Dosage and administration (adults).

Either Optiray 240 or Optiray 320 is recommended for this procedure. The usual individual injection for visualisation of the carotid or vertebral arteries is 2 to 12 mL, repeated as necessary. Aortic arch injection for a simultaneous four vessel study requires 20 to 50 mL. Total procedural doses should not usually exceed 150 mL.

Peripheral arteriography.

Additional precautions.

Pulsation should be present in the artery to be injected. In thromboangiitis obliterans or ascending infection associated with severe ischaemia, angiography should be performed with extreme caution, if at all.

Dosage and administration (adults).

Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 is recommended for this procedure. The usual individual injection volumes for visualisation of various peripheral arteries are as follows. Aorta-iliac runoff: 60 mL (range: 20 to 90 mL); common iliac, femoral: 40 mL (range: 10 to 50 mL); subclavian, brachial: 20 mL (range: 15 to 30 mL).
These doses may be repeated as necessary. Total procedural doses should not usually exceed 150 mL.

Selective visceral and renal arteriography and aortography.

Additional precautions and adverse effects.

In aortography, depending on the technique employed, the risks of this procedure also included the following: injury to the aorta and neighbouring organs, pleural puncture, renal damage including infarction and acute tubular necrosis with oliguria and anuria, accidental filling of the renal arteries in the presence of pre-existing renal disease, retroperitoneal haemorrhage, and spinal cord injury and pathology associated with the syndrome of transverse myelitis.

Dosage and administration (adults).

Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 is recommended for this procedure. The usual individual injection volumes for visualisation of the aorta and various visceral arteries are as follows. Aorta: 45 mL (range: 10 to 80 mL); celiac: 45 mL (range: 12 to 60 mL); superior mesenteric: 45 mL (range: 15 to 60 mL); renal or inferior mesenteric: 9 mL (range: 6 to 15 mL).
These doses may be repeated as necessary. Total procedural doses should not usually exceed 150 mL.

Coronary arteriography and ventriculography.

Additional precautions and adverse reactions.

Selective coronary arteriography should be performed only in selected patients and those in whom the expected benefits outweigh the procedural risk. The inherent risks of angiocardiography in patients with chronic pulmonary emphysema must be weighed against the necessity for performing this procedure.
Cardiac decompensation, serious arrhythmias, myocardial ischaemia, myocardial infarction may occur during coronary arteriography and ventriculography. However, electrocardiographic and haemodynamic changes occur with less frequency and severity with ioversol injection than with conventional ionic media.
Mandatory prerequisites to the procedure are specialised personnel, ECG monitoring apparatus and adequate facilities for immediate resuscitation and cardioversion. Electrocardiograms and vital signs should be routinely monitored throughout the procedure.

Dosage and administration (adults).

Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 is recommended for this procedure. The usual individual injection volumes for visualisation of the coronary arteries and left ventricle are:
Left coronary: 8 mL (range: 2 to 10 mL); right coronary: 6 mL (range: 1 to 10 mL); left ventricle: 40 mL (range: 30 to 50 mL).
These doses may be repeated as necessary. Total procedural dose for the combined procedures should not usually exceed 150 mL.

Paediatric angiocardiography.

Additional precautions.

Mandatory prerequisites to the procedure are specialized personnel, ECG monitoring apparatus and adequate facilities for immediate resuscitation and cardioversion. Electrocardiograms and vital signs should be routinely monitored throughout the procedure. Paediatric patients are at higher risk of experiencing adverse events during contrast medium administration, these include children having asthma, a sensitivity to medication and/or allergens, congestive heart failure, a serum creatinine greater than 1.5 mg/dL, or those less than 12 months of age.

Dosage and administration.

Optiray 320 is recommended for this procedure. The usual single injection dose for Optiray 320 is 1.25 mL/kg of body weight with a range of 1 mL/kg to 1.5 mL/kg. When multiple injections are given, the total administered dose should not exceed 5 mL/kg up to a total volume of 75 mL.

Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA).

All of the arteriographic procedures described above can be performed using digital subtraction techniques.

Dosage and administration (adults).

The recommended doses are similar to those used for conventional arteriography. The flow rate of the vessel being injected should always be considered when selecting the concentration and dose. Total dosage should not usually exceed 150 mL.

Venography.

Additional precautions.

Special care is required when venography is performed in patients with suspected thrombosis, phlebitis, severe ischaemic disease, local infection or a totally obstructed venous system. In order to minimise extravasation during injection, fluoroscopy is recommended.

Dosage and administration (adults).

Either Optiray 240, Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 is recommended for this procedure. The usual dose is 50 to 100 mL per extremity. Total dosage should not usually exceed 150 mL.
Following the procedure, the venous system should be flushed with Sodium Chloride Injection USP or 5% glucose in water (D5W). Massage and elevation are also helpful in clearing the contrast media from the extremity.

Computed tomography.

Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 is recommended for these procedures.

Head imaging.

Dosage and administration.

Adults: The usual dosage is 50 to 150 mL of Optiray 320 or Optiray 350. Scanning may be performed immediately after completion of the intravenous administration. Total dosage should not usually exceed 150 mL.
Children: The usual dosage for use in children is 1.9 mL/kg (range: 1.3 to 2.4 mL/kg) of Optiray 320.

Body imaging.

Dosage and administration.

Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 may be administered by bolus injection, by rapid infusion, or by a combination of both. The usual dose for bolus injection is 25 to 75 mL.
Adults: The usual dose for infusion is 50 to 150 mL. Total dosage should not usually exceed 150 mL.
Children: The usual dosage for use in children is 2 mL/kg (range: 1.7 to 2.4 mL/kg) of Optiray 320.

Intravenous urography.

Dosage and administration.

Optiray 320 or Optiray 350 is recommended for routine and high dose excretory urography.
Adults: The usual dose for routine excretory urography in adults is 50 to 75 mL of Optiray 320 or Optiray 350. Higher doses may be indicated to achieve optimum results where poor visualisation is anticipated (e.g. elderly patients or patients with impaired renal function). In these patients, high dose urography may be preferred, using Optiray 320 at a dose of 1.5 to 2 mL/kg (maximum 150 mL).
Children: Optiray 320 at doses of 0.5 mL/kg to 3 mL/kg of body weight has produced diagnostic opacification of the excretory tract. The usual dose for children is 1 mL/kg to 1.5 mL/kg. Dosage for infants and children (on a mL/kg basis) gradually decreases with age. In one study, mean dose (mL/kg) decreased from 2.7 in infants to 1.0 in children 12-18 years of age. The total administered dose should not exceed 3 mL/kg.

4.7 Effects on Ability to Drive and Use Machines

The effects of this medicine on a person's ability to drive and use machines were not assessed as part of its registration.

4.9 Overdose

Activated charcoal may reduce absorption of the drug if given within one or two hours after ingestion. In patients who are not fully conscious or have impaired gag reflex, consideration should be given to administering activated charcoal via a nasogastric tube, once the airway is protected.
Whole bowel irrigation (e.g. 1 or 2 litres of polyethylene glycol solution orally per hour until rectal effluent is clear) may be useful for gut decontamination.
The adverse effects of overdosage are life threatening and affect mainly the pulmonary and cardiovascular system. Treatment of an overdosage is directed toward the support of all vital functions, and prompt institution of symptomatic therapy.
Ioversol does not bind significantly to plasma or serum protein and is, therefore, dialyzable.
For information on the management of overdose, contact the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26 (Australia).

7 Medicine Schedule (Poisons Standard)

Unscheduled.

6 Pharmaceutical Particulars

6.1 List of Excipients

Trometamol; trometamol hydrochloride; sodium hydroxide; hydrochloric acid; sodium calcium edetate; water for injections.

6.2 Incompatibilities

Incompatibilities were either not assessed or not identified as part of the registration of this medicine.

6.3 Shelf Life

In Australia, information on the shelf life can be found on the public summary of the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG). The expiry date can be found on the packaging.

6.4 Special Precautions for Storage

Store below 25°C, protect from light and secondary X-rays. Do not freeze.

6.5 Nature and Contents of Container

Presentations.

Optiray 240 (ioversol injection 51% w/v).

30 mL glass vial (AUST R 15326); 50 mL glass vial (AUST R 49410); Ultraject 50 mL prefilled plastic syringe hand-held (AUST R 46639); Ultraject 125 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 46640).

Optiray 320 (ioversol injection 68% w/v).

20 mL glass vial (AUST R 20034); 30 mL glass vial (AUST R 49421); 50 mL glass vial (AUST R 49422); 100 mL glass vial (AUST R 49423); 150 mL glass vial (AUST R 49424); 200 mL glass vial (AUST R 49425); Ultraject 50 mL prefilled plastic syringe hand-held (AUST R 46641); Ultraject 50 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 46641); Ultraject 75 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 73580); Ultraject 125 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 46642).

Optiray 350 (ioversol injection 74% w/v).

20 mL glass vial (AUST R 49610); 30 mL glass vial (AUST R 47856); 50 mL glass vial (AUST R 47996); 75 mL glass vial (AUST R 47997); 100 mL glass vial (AUST R 47998); 150 mL glass vial (AUST R 49611); 200 mL glass vial (AUST R 49612); Ultraject 30 mL prefilled plastic syringe hand-held (AUST R 51795); Ultraject 50 mL prefilled plastic syringe hand-held (AUST R 51796); Ultraject 50 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 51796); Ultraject 75 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 70059); Ultraject 100 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 61983); Ultraject 125 mL prefilled plastic syringe power injector (AUST R 61984).
Optiray products are packed in boxes of 1, 10 or 20 units.
Not all presentations are available.

6.6 Special Precautions for Disposal

In Australia, any unused medicine or waste material should be disposed of by taking to your local pharmacy.

Summary Table of Changes